Nexus Lab Staff

Dawn Opel

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

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Bio

Dawn Opel is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Nexus Lab and Computational Innovation Group, and a recent PhD in Rhetoric, Composition, and Linguistics. She also holds a JD from the University of North Carolina School of Law. Dawn's research is positioned in three areas: digital rhetoric, technical communication, and the digital humanities. She studies objects in digital spaces and the built environment, from new media texts such as image macros, to technical communication such as packaging design and retail displays, to digital tools and platforms designed for digital humanities projects. Her work involves designing and making these objects as a digital rhetorician and technical communicator. From her perspective as a digital creator, attorney, and feminist scholar, she focuses on social justice and ethical concerns as they relate to the user experience with, and social circulation of, these digital objects and spaces.

Dawn holds a joint appointment with ASU-Polytechnic's Technical Communication program, and currently teaches ENG 445/545: Content Management and Topic Based Web Authoring. Dawn has also taught courses in new media for ASU's Film & Media Studies program, as well as writing courses for ASU Writing Programs, with emphasis on multimodal composition and writing for the professions.

Allegra W. Smith

Communication Designer

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Jacqueline Wernimont

Interim Director, Nexus Lab and Assistant Professor of English

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Bio

I am an assistant professor of English at Arizona State University, where I specialize in early modern literature and digital humanities. I’m affiliated with the fabulous Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and work with the great folks at the Nexus Lab. I teach on topics related to early modern literature, digital humanities, history of science, and possible worlds theory.

I'm broadly interested in the relationships between numerative and poetic practices and this manifests in a couple of different areas of focus. One focuses on relationships between early modern poetry and mathematics and on the practical and theoretical issues around digital archives. I'm also working on a long history of the "Quantified Self" and ethical or "vibrant" approaches to data. Another is focused on feminist readings and interventions in popular computing culture – I collaborate in this area with members of the FemTechNet network.